Helensburgh Heritage Trust Photo Gallery

Your online photo album


Home :: Login
Helensburgh Heritage Trust :: Album list :: Last uploads :: Last comments :: Most viewed :: Top rated :: My Favorites :: Search

Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > John Logie Baird

Last additions - John Logie Baird
Whole-Wonder-Wall-w.jpg
Whole Wonder Wall26 viewsA tribute to John Logie Baird on the wall of the University of Strathclyde Graham Hills Building in George Street, Glasgow — one of a number of massive official murals. Appropriately, on the right is Dr Who's Tardis. Image supplied by Des Gorra.Oct 03, 2017
JLB-TV-photo-w.jpg
Telechrome demo75 viewsJohn Logie Baird's August 1944 demonstration of the Telechrome, the world’s first cathode ray tube for colour television, was an historic event. The picture was large and bright, a great improvement over the small flickery images of the old mechanical system.Jul 01, 2017
BairdWonderwall-w.jpg
Wonderwall254 viewsA tribute to John Logie Baird on the wall of the University of Strathclyde Graham Hills Building in George Street, Glasgow — one of a number of massive official murals. Image supplied by Des Gorra.Feb 18, 2017
John-Logie-Baird013-w.jpg
Portrait270 viewsA photographic portrait of Helensburgh-born TV inventor John Logie Baird. Image date unknown.Feb 02, 2017
Baird-1926-apparatus-w.jpg
Original apparatus286 viewsHelensburgh inventor John Logie Baird is pictured with the first television transmitter, made up literally from odds and ends, in September 1926. The apparatus was used in the world's first successful demonstrations of instantaneous moving scenes by wire and wireless. It is now housed in the Science Museum in South Kensington, London.Jan 24, 2017
John-Logie-Baird-1930-w.jpg
Portrait332 viewsAn August 23 1930 photo of John Logie Baird.Nov 07, 2016
1929_after_daylight_transmission.jpg
Daylight TV353 viewsAn October 3 1929 photo of John Logie Baird explaining the mechanism of the television receiver while testing daylight transmission. His latest experiments in daylight transmission featured Swedish exercises performed by an instructor transmitted to the receiver in movie form. On the left is his technical assistant, Ben Clapp.May 04, 2016
JLB-1929-Noctovision-w.jpg
Noctovision330 viewsA 1929 image of TV inventor John Logie Baird working on another of his inventions, Noctovision, a night vision device, on Boxhill in Surrey. It was slung on gimbals and rotated about a circular compass scale, and was said to be able to pick up a ship's lights in fog and give a compass bearing, or televise people who were in complete darkness.Mar 06, 2016
Baird-Christmas-card-w.jpg
Merry Christmas355 viewsThis Christmas card was sent to Helensburgh TV inventor John Logie Baird's widow Margaret in 1948. It is signed by J.D.Percy, who worked for Baird Television in the 1930s and lived on until about 1985, and depicts the first demonstration of colour television in London in July 1928. Image by courtesy of the inventor's son Professor Malcolm Baird, who is president of Helensburgh Heritage Trust.Dec 17, 2015
Baird-with-equipment-w.jpg
Checking equipment349 viewsA press picture dated October 3 1929 shows John Logie Baird with his transmitting equipment. The caption stated: "Mr Wm Baird of London is the inventor of wireless vision, a means by which objects can be wirelessed without the aid of photographs, on the same principle as sound is now transmitted by wireless. By his invention, one will be able to receive messages as at present with the addition that the listener will actually be able to see who is speaking for see actual events at the moment they are occurring."Nov 29, 2015
1929_Baird-2-pic-w.jpg
Transatlantic transmission368 viewsAn October 3 1929 newspaper image of John Logie Baird and his TV equipment. The caption on a companion picture stated: "One more dream of science has been realised. Man's vision has spanned the Ocean, and transatlantic television has been demonstrated to be a reality. A man and a woman sat before an electric eye in a London laboratory last night, and a group of people in a darkened basement in the village of Hartsdale, New York, watched them turn their heads and move from side to side. The images were crude and broken, but they were images nevertheless."
Oct 29, 2015
1929_Baird-pic-w.jpg
Stooky Bill361 viewsAn October 3 1929 newspaper image of John Logie Baird with Stooky Bill, the dummy he used in his demonstrations, and TV equipment. The caption stated: "One more dream of science has been realised. Man's vision has spanned the Ocean, and transatlantic television has been demonstrated to be a reality. A man and a woman sat before an electric eye in a London laboratory last night, and a group of people in a darkened basement in the village of Hartsdale, New York, watched them turn their heads and move from side to side. The images were crude and broken, but they were images nevertheless."Oct 22, 2015
63 files on 6 page(s) 1