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Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > John Logie Baird

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Baird-by-Coia-(lr)1.jpg
Baird by Coia481 viewsThis portrait of John Logie Baird by eminent Glasgow artist Emilio Coia was commissioned for Lomond School but was lost in the St Bride’s building fire in 1997, but both Lomond and Professor Malcolm Baird have colour laser copies. The idea was to provide a visible tribute to the school’s greatest former pupil in the absence of any commemoration in the school, and it was unveiled in September 1990 by the inventor’s widow, Mrs Margaret Baird.
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Merry Christmas347 viewsThis Christmas card was sent to Helensburgh TV inventor John Logie Baird's widow Margaret in 1948. It is signed by J.D.Percy, who worked for Baird Television in the 1930s and lived on until about 1985, and depicts the first demonstration of colour television in London in July 1928. Image by courtesy of the inventor's son Professor Malcolm Baird, who is president of Helensburgh Heritage Trust.
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Colour television554 viewsOn July 3 1928, John Logie Baird achieved colour television for the first time. The camera and receiver were modified versions of the mechanically scanned system first demonstrated by Baird in January 1926. Two months later he demonstrated his new discovery to a scientific audience in Glasgow at the annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. The picture is an artistic reconstruction done in 1949 of the July demonstration at his company’s laboratory in London.
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Erecting aerial422 viewsThis image from the 1926 book 'Television: Seeing by Wireless', written by Alfred Dinsdale, A.M.I.R.E., shows John Logie Baird an assistant erecting the aerial at 2T.V., the world's first television broadcasting station at the offices of Television Limited in the heart of London. The receiving station was nine miles away at Harrow. A copy of the first edition of this book fetched over £10,000 at a Christies auction.
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1906 car565 viewsJohn Logie Baird (right) and a friend are seens in his 'Reaper and Binder' three-wheeled car in the Trossachs in 1906. The car was later written off after a crash on the Loch Lomond road.
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John Logie Baird618 viewsTV inventor John Logie Baird in his days as a pupil at Larchfield School, Helensburgh, now part of Lomond School.
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Baird's electric light plant516 viewsAs a schoolboy John Logie Baird installed an electric light plant in the family home, the Manse, in West Argyle Street, Helensburgh. He is seen here with part of the plant. A home-made dynamo was driven by a water-wheel connected to the water main, and with a collection of jam jars and sheet lead successfully generated current.
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Burgh plaque unveiled518 viewsOn May 1 1952 a commemorative plaque for John Logie Baird was unveiled at Helensburgh's Municipal Buildings. On the left is Provost William Lever performing the unveiling. On his left are one of the Bailies, then Annie Baird, Diana Baird, Jean Conley (nee Baird), Malcolm Baird, two councillors or officials, and the second Bailie.
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Plaque unveiling485 viewsHastings museum curator Miss Victoria Williams tells a story about John Logie Baird and his work in Hastings at the unveiling on March 12 1997 of a plaque at the house in Linton Crescent where he lived in the early 1920s and developed his invention of television. Centre is Dr Brian Manley, president of the Institute of Physics, and right is the Mayor of Hastings.
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Receiving Televisor404 viewsThis image from the 1926 book 'Television: Seeing by Wireless', written by Alfred Dinsdale, A.M.I.R.E., shows John Logie Baird and a young lady looking at his Receiving Televisor. A copy of the first edition of this book fetched over £10,000 at a Christies auction.
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Mr and Mrs John Logie Baird577 viewsJohn and Margaret Baird on holiday at St Tropez in the south of France in April 1939, their last holiday before World War Two.
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Wireless transmitter402 viewsThis image from the 1926 book 'Television: Seeing by Wireless', written by Alfred Dinsdale, A.M.I.R.E., shows John Logie Baird with his wireless transmitting set at 2T.V. It had a power of 250 watts and a wave length of 200 metres. A copy of the first edition of this book fetched over £10,000 at a Christies auction.
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