Helensburgh Heritage Trust Photo Gallery

Your online photo album


Home :: Login
Helensburgh Heritage Trust :: Album list :: Last uploads :: Last comments :: Most viewed :: Top rated :: My Favorites :: Search

Home > Heritage > Welcome to the Helensburgh Heritage Trust Gallery > Transport — Steamers

TITLE  +   - 
FILE NAME  +   - 
DATE  +   - 
POSITION  +   - 
Waverley.jpg
Waverley leaves Helensburgh622 viewsThe Waverley is pictured leaving Helensburgh. Photo by Joe McKendrick, date unknown.
Waverley-at-Kilcreggan5242.jpg
Waverley at Kilcreggan668 viewsThe world's last seagoing paddle steamer Waverley at Kilcreggan Pier. Photo by J.Ballantyne.
Waverley_(R_Ryan).jpg
Waverley at Helensburgh960 viewsThe paddle steamer Waverley arrives at Helensburgh pier in the evening sunlight of June 22 2005 on the annual midsummer sail. Built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. Photo by Robert Ryan.
Waverley-at-Craigendoran.jpg
Waverley at Craigendoran730 viewsBuilt by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. She replaced the previous Waverley, built in 1899 and sunk at Dunkirk in 1940, andcruised to all parts of the Clyde Estuary until withdrawn after the 1973 season by Caledonian-MacBrayne. Next year she was sold to the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society and re-entered service in 1975 with support from local authorities. She is pictured at Craigendoran pier in 1972.
Waverley-at-Craigendoran~0.jpg
Waverley at Craigendoran499 viewsThe steamer Waverley at Craigendoran pier in 1968, with part of the Caledonia in view. Built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. She replaced the first Waverley, built in 1899 and sunk at Dunkirk in 1940, and cruised the Clyde until 1973 for Caledonian-MacBrayne. In 1974 she was sold to the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society and re-entered service in 1975. She calls regularly at Helensburgh in summer.
Waverley_and_Balmoral.jpg
Waverley and Balmoral783 viewsThe Paddle Steamer Waverley, built in 1947 on the Clyde, and Classic Cruise Ship Balmoral, built in 1949 in Southampton, were together in dry dock for the first time ever on April 18 2012. The Garvel Clyde Dry Dock in Greenock was playing host to these ships, which this year are celebrating 200 years of commercial steam navigation, with the anniversary of Henry Bell’s Comet which was built in Port Glasgow.
waverley-2012-w.jpg
Waverley 2012340 viewsHelensburgh photographer Brian Averell took this stunning image of the paddle steamer Waverley heading down river from the pedestrian walkway on the Erskine Bridge in July 2012, and it is reproduced here with his permission. Built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. She replaced the first Waverley, built in 1899 and sunk at Dunkirk in 1940, and cruised the Clyde until 1973 for Caledonian-MacBrayne. In 1974 she was sold to the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society and re-entered service in 1975. She calls regularly at Helensburgh in summer.
TSS_Duchess_of_Montrose2275.jpg
TSS Duchess of Montrose669 viewsThe 806-ton turbine steamer was launched on May 10 1930 at the yard of William Denny & Bros Ltd., Dumbarton. The first 'one-class' vessel on the Clyde, she cruised in the lower Firth to Arran, Ayr and as far as Stranraer, Campbeltown and Inveraray, and she remained on the Clyde during World War II serving Wemyss Bay and Rothesay. Converted to oil in 1956 she undertook the long cruises, especially to Inveraray, in the post-war period. She was withdrawn in 1964, and scrapped in Ghent, Belgium, in 1965.
PS_Saint_Columba2284.jpg
TS Saint Columba742 viewsThe 785-ton turbine steamer was launched on April 9 1912 at the yard of William Denny & Bros Ltd., Dumbarton. Placed on the Campeltown run in succession to her namesake, she was requisitioned as a troop transport ship from 1915 to 1919 during which time she rammed and sank a German U-Boat. After the war she served Campbeltown, Inveraray and Ardrishaig until World War Two, when she was an accommodation ship at Greenock. She returned to the summer Ardrishaig service from 1947 until the end of the 1958 season, but was withdrawn and scrapped shortly afterwards. She is pictured arriving at Rothesay, circa 1950.
Duchess_of_Argyll2021.jpg
TS Duchess of Argyll805 viewsThe 593-ton turbine steamer Duchess of Argyll was built by William Denny & Brothers at Dumbarton in 1906 for the Ardrossan to Arran run. Requisitioned as a transport ship in World War One, she returned to service in the 1919 season, making the Kyles of Bute and Arran run her own. She moved to the long cruises to Inveraray and Campbeltown in 1936, returned to the Kyles of Bute run after the war, and was sold in 1952 to the Admiralty for experimental work at Portland. She was scrapped at Newhaven in 1970.
PS_Waverley_(1st)299.jpg
The first Waverley529 viewsThe first paddle steamer Waverley, built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, in 1899, was bombed and sunk at Dunkirk on May 30 1940 — the 41st anniversary of her launch date — as HMS Waverley, and 350 officers men lost their lives. The 537 ton North British Steam Packet Company vessel was purchased in 1902 by the North British Railway and in 1923 by the London and North Eastern Railway. Image circa 1925.
Waverley_Old_LNER~0.jpg
The first Waverley719 viewsThe first paddle steamer Waverley, built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, in 1899, was bombed and sunk at Dunkirk on May 30 1940 — the 41st anniversary of her launch date — as HMS Waverley, and 350 officers men lost their lives. The 537 ton North British Steam Packet Company vessel was purchased in 1902 by the North British Railway and in 1923 by the London and North Eastern Railway. Image date unknown.
75 files on 7 page(s) 1