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Redtowers-interior-1-w.jpg
Redtower887 viewsAn early interior image of Redtower, 4 Douglas Drive West, Helensburgh, a red sandstone chateau-like mansion built in 1898 by distinguished local architect William Leiper for grocer James Allan. At the end of the 20th century it was bought by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Glasgow and used as a drug rehabilitation centre, but it has since reverted to private use and the name has been changed to Redtowers. Image supplied by Dr Nigel Allan.
Redtowers-interior-2-w.jpg
Redtower960 viewsAn early image of the dining room of Redtower, 4 Douglas Drive West, Helensburgh, a red sandstone chateau-like mansion built in 1898 by distinguished local architect William Leiper for grocer James Allan. At the end of the 20th century it was bought by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Glasgow and used as a drug rehabilitation centre, but it has since reverted to private use and the name has been changed to Redtowers. Image supplied by Dr Nigel Allan.
Redtowers-w.jpg
Redtower1010 viewsAn early image of Redtower, 4 Douglas Drive West, Helensburgh, a red sandstone chateau-like mansion built in 1898 by distinguished local architect William Leiper for grocer James Allan. At the end of the 20th century it was bought by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Glasgow and used as a drug rehabilitation centre, but it has since reverted to private use and the name has been changed to Redtowers. Image supplied by Dr Nigel Allan.
Rhu_Arden_05_10_13.jpg
Rhu Arden905 viewsA 2013 image of Rhu Arden, 1 Upper Sutherland Crescent, Helensburgh, which was built about 1871 by noted architect William Leiper and was originally named Bonnington. Later he built his own home, Terpersie, next door. Photo by Donald Fullarton.
Rosneath-Castle-and-bay.jpg
Rosneath Castle and Camsail Bay1487 viewsCompleted in 1806 by London architect Joseph Bonomi, the neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and demolished in 1961. Image published by E.Eakin, Post Office, Roseneath (as it was spelt then); date unknown.
Rosneath-Castle-demolition.jpg
Rosneath Castle demolition1150 viewsCompleted in 1806 by London-based architect Joseph Bonomi, this neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and demolished in 1961 — when this picture was taken.
rosneathpier.jpg
Ferry Inn, Rosneath1718 viewsThe Edwin Lutyens-designed Ferry Inn was commissioned by Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, in the 1890s and rebuilt from an old pub. Bob Hope stayed there while entertaining troops at the nearby World War Two naval base. It fell into disuse, but was rebuilt again in the late 1950s by boatbuilder Peter Boyle. Image is undated.
rosneath_castle.jpg
Rosneath Castle1772 viewsCompleted in 1806 by London-based architect Joseph Bonomi, this neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and demolished in 1961. Image date unknown.
Rosneath_Castle.jpg
Rosneath Castle1492 viewsThe castle and grounds from the air. Completed in 1806 by London-based architect Joseph Bonomi, this neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and demolished in 1961. Image circa 1939.
Rosneath_Castle29711.jpg
Rosneath Castle1424 viewsCompleted in 1806 by London-based architect Joseph Bonomi, this neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and demolished in 1961. Image circa 1905.
Rosneath_Castle_from_side.jpg
Rosneath Castle1222 viewsCompleted in 1806 by London-based architect Joseph Bonomi, this neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and demolished in 1961. Image circa 1903.
Rosneath_Castle_print_1831.jpg
Roseneath Castle686 viewsAn 1832 engraved print of Roseneath (as it was spelt in those days) Castle. Drawn by John Preston Neale and engraved by W.Wallis, it was published by Jones and Co. of Finsbury Square, London. Completed in 1806 by London-based architect Joseph Bonomi, this neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and finally demolished in 1961.
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