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Rosneath Castle1802 viewsThe castle and grounds from the air. Completed in 1806 by London-based architect Joseph Bonomi, this neo-classical mansion replaced a castle burnt down in 1802. It was used as a military hospital during the First World War and was home to Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise, the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, until her death in 1939. It was an HQ for the Rosneath Naval Base in World War Two, then abandoned, then damaged by fire in 1947, and demolished in 1961. Image date unknown.
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Shandon Hydro1841 viewsShandon Hydro and the extensive gardens. Originally West Shandon, this magnificent building was the home of Robert Napier, the greatest figure in Clyde shipbuilding and marine engineering in the mid-19th century. During World War One the Hydro became a hospital, and in World War Two it was used by the army. In 1951 it became a hotel again, but in 1957 it was closed and demolished.
Inverclyde,_Cove.jpg
Inverclyde, Cove1504 viewsInverclyde at Cove while it was a Holiday Home run by Glasgow YMCA. Also known as Hartfield House, this Cove mansion was owned at one time by James, Lord Inverclyde, second son of the first Lord Inverclyde, and grandson of Sir George Burns, Bart., founder of the Cunard Line. An enthusiastic yachtsman, he was Vice-Commodore of the Royal Northern Yacht Club at Rhu and a member of the Royal Yacht Squadron, president of the Scottish Hockey Association, a cricketer, curler, and tennis player. Later it belonged to his son Alan, the 4th Baron, before it became a YMCA holiday home. The mansion was demolished in the 1960s. Image date unknown.
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Inverclyde, Cove833 viewsInverclyde at Cove while it was a Holiday Home run by Glasgow YMCA. Also known as Hartfield House, this Cove mansion was owned at one time by James, Lord Inverclyde, second son of the first Lord Inverclyde, and grandson of Sir George Burns, Bart., founder of the Cunard Line. An enthusiastic yachtsman, he was Vice-Commodore of the Royal Northern Yacht Club at Rhu and a member of the Royal Yacht Squadron, president of the Scottish Hockey Association, a cricketer, curler, and tennis player. Later it belonged to his son Alan, the 4th Baron, and then became a YMCA holiday home. The mansion was demolished in the 1960s. Image circa 1913.
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Invergare1374 viewsInvergare, Rhu, originally named Rowaleyn, was built in 1855 to the design of architect James Smith, father of Madeleine Smith, the socialite later accused of murder, to be his family's summer home. James Smith designed, among other famous buildings, the Victoria Baths in West Nile Street (1837), the Collegiate School, Garnethill (1840), the McClellan Galleries (1855), and Bellahouston Church (1863), all in Glasgow, and Stirling Library (1863). Image circa 1912, published by M.Gordon, Row Pier.
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Invergare, Rhu675 viewsAn old image of Invergare, Rhu, originally named Rowaleyn, which was built in 1855 to the design of architect James Smith, father of Madeleine Smith, the socialite later accused of murder, to be his family's summer home. James Smith designed, among other famous buildings, the Victoria Baths in West Nile Street (1837), the Collegiate School, Garnethill (1840), the McClellan Galleries (1855), and Bellahouston Church (1863), all in Glasgow, and Stirling Library (1863). Image date unknown.
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Kilmahew, Cardross1772 viewsKilmahew House at Cardross, built in 1868 to designs by John Burnet. In 1948 the property was acquired by the Archdiocese of Glasgow, with the surrounding estate, and the now derelict St Peter's Priests Training College was built nearby. The mansion was demolished in 1995 after it had been gutted in a fire started by vandals. Image circa 1932.
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Kilmahew Castle1739 viewsKilmahew Castle at Cardross was built on land granted to the Napier family by Malcolm, the Earl of Lennox, around 1290. The castle, originally a four-storey 16th century tower house, was built in the 16th century by the Napiers, who owned it until 1820. The estate had to be sold to pay off the last Laird's gambling debts.The ruins were acquired by the Archdiocese of Glasgow, with the surrounding estate, in 1948, and the now derelict St Peter's Priests Training College was built nearby. Image date unknown.
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Kilmahew Castle816 viewsKilmahew Castle at Cardross was built on land granted to the Napier family by Malcolm, the Earl of Lennox, around 1290. The castle, originally a four-storey 16th century tower house, was built in the 16th century by the Napiers, who owned it until 1820. The estate had to be sold to pay off the last Laird's gambling debts. The ruins were acquired by the Archdiocese of Glasgow, with the surrounding estate, in 1948, and the now derelict St Peter's Priests Training College was built nearby. Image, taken on February 1 2015, supplied by Stewart Noble.
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Knockderry Castle1914 viewsA view of Knockderry Castle at Cove, published by MacFarlane Brothers of Cove, circa 1908. Built on the site of a Danish fort about 1855 to the design of the famous architect Alexander 'Greek' Thomson, Knockderry Castle became the family home of the Templeton carpet manufacturing family. In 1896-7 another famous architect, William Leiper, designed an extension and a lodge for John Templeton, and a famous guest of his at the castle was millionaire philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. For some years a hotel, it is now a private residence again.
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Knockderry Castle, Cove1753 viewsBuilt on the site of a Danish fort about 1855 to the design of the famous architect Alexander 'Greek' Thomson, Knockderry Castle at Cove became the family home of the Templeton carpet manufacturing family. In 1896-7 another famous architect, William Leiper, designed an extension and a lodge for John Templeton, and a famous guest of his at the castle was millionaire philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. For some years a hotel, it is now a private residence again. Image circa 1970.
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Knockderry Castle, Cove1996 viewsBuilt on the site of a Danish fort about 1855 to the design of the famous architect Alexander 'Greek' Thomson, Knockderry Castle at Cove became the family home of the Templeton carpet manufacturing family. In 1896-7 another famous architect, William Leiper, designed an extension and a lodge for John Templeton, and a famous guest of his at the castle was millionaire philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. For some years a hotel, it is now a private residence again. Image circa 1912.
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